physician21

about medical tacts and talents

Archive for the tag “medical treatment”

Orthotherapia (orthocura) – an interview –

orthotherapia (orthocura)

Interviewer: Hallo, everybody! Welcome to this episode of “medical views”. Today, we have another very exciting view of medical care, namely “orthotherapia or orthocura”. Let’s greet our guest; Mr. Physician 21, welcome back to our program!

Physician 21: Thank you. I am very happy to be with you today.

Interviewer: Would you explain the core concept of your orthotherapy?

Physician 21: Well. To start with, the idea is not by any means very novel but more it gathers and harmonizes some basic medical principles in a well structured and meaningful medical philosophy.

Interviewer: So, what are the main pillars of your idea?

Physician 21: Orthotherpia or orthocura claims that among all possible medical care regimens there could be only one that best suits a given medical case. While in this regard the conception of a presumed bodily functional hierarchy would be in the centre, some medical peculiarities are also much concerned including patient type, medical remedy type and mode of application.

Interviewer: Very fine Mr. Physician 21. Now, we are about to get that well structured and meaningful medical philosophy of orthotherapy. Would you bring us closer to those very interesting medical presumptions; first, what do you mean by bodily functional hierarchy?

Physician 21: The bodily functional hierarchy would mean that the various physiological functions and their body organs may be ordered in such hierarchical manner so that one function would be prioritized in respect to another. An example could be: lung > stomach > heart > liver and spleen > muscle and bone > gonad and kidney > brain. Such conception of possible hierarchically ordered body organs would help appreciate disease evolution from one side and disease management order from the other side.

Interviewer: How nice! We would perceive a glimpse of ‘alternative medicine’ in that presumption of bodily functional hierarchy, would you say that?

Physician 21: Well, I should say that I am not an expert in alternative medical methods. Anyhow, as I already said in the beginning the idea may not be very novel and it should make use of much of the well known medical arts.

Interviewer: Would you give practical examples to further explain that?

Physician 21: Well. Let’s consider a case of fever with signs of dehydration. The dehydration may be first corrected by giving appropriate fluids and then the body temperature could be assessed and managed accordingly. In such case, prioritizing fever to dehydration would be inappropriate and cost-ineffective. Another example could be the improvement of anxiety which reflects neurologic stress on practicing some suitable kind of sports. Again, in that case over consumption of anxiolytics may be cost-ineffective.

Interviewer: you mean that in handling diseases it makes great sense which disease or organ function to consider first to achieve a rather smooth and nature-coping healing process.

Physician 21: That is it. Thank you.

Interviewer: To summarize, “orthotherpy” or “orthocura” would emphasize the significance of choosing the management regimen with the presumption of natural hierarchical order of body functions and systems. Thank you very much. Mr. Physician 21 for this very interesting information.

Physician 21: Thank you too.

Physician and physical contact

In the medical field ‘physical contact’ usually implies the medically required contact with patients and its aspect of disease communicability. However, this generally perceived view may need some reform to emphasize the two opposite sides, the profits and the risks. Although modern tools of communication could be of great help, they are used only in cases where direct contact of the doctor with patient is instantly not manageable. What kind of blesses a skilful physician can have in his/her attendance! The look; the affection; the touch; the wisdom and the proof. This may refer to the true start of the medical care from mind and not matter, from tact but not tempt, from thoughtfulness and not automaticity. Some people can argue metaphysical working in even lay and plain dealings and for them the medical cases wouldn’t be exceptions. The medical tactfulness can be gained in steps and over time. It comprises emotional, behavioral, ethical and medical progresses. In my opinion, the value of the clever physician lies in the lengthy and subjective path to acquire such collegial attitude and not only the cost and difficulty of the academic courses. Should the physician’s responsible physical contact be rightly and adequately perceived by the patient, this can be a subject of individuals’ variations. For example, rubbing the hairs and cheering up of a child in a medical session may not look well reasoned by the child’s parent(s). Accordingly, the physician may show sympathy and encouragements just as little and sufficient as possible to balance between his/her emotional generosity from one side and the patient’s understanding and conception from the other.

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