clinic

Human health and filling in the gaps

There are seemingly no clear boundaries between health and disease of humans. From one side the judgement of one’s health may be subjective, and from the other side the feeling of being healthy or sick may be intermingled in the different parts of the same day. One of the most impactful insights in medical sciences is to find the appropriate definition of health and disease statuses. The definition of health laid by the World Health Organization states health as “the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.” Apparently and in practical terms no one on Earth would fit to the WHO definition as being a healthy human.
The human health, being the sum of several biological components or entities, should not be regarded apart from its inherent dynamic nature. It can, therefore, be considered and expressed in hand of mathematical probability estimation. The human health may be, accordingly, defined as the state of satisfactory physical, mental and social showing in average life conditions with or without auxiliary means in terms of lifestyle and/or medical treatment. Therefore, in light of this definition while health state judgment may be individually tailored and appreciated, the presence or absence of certain physical or psychological disease state would be regarded as a constitutional health element for every individual. For the delineation of such constitutional health elements, physicians and other health scientists may succeed in writing down all known conditions (or diseases) with their different possible classifications.
Such dynamic nature of human health should give a red alarm to physicians not to make statements on one’s health based only on some data in limited clinical sessions or visits. In many cases, closer observation and more rigorous data collection may be needed before the health state of an individual can be judged.
On handling certain health condition, the natural body resources and compensatory reserves (so-called natural healing power) should not be overseen, but rather boosted and encouraged. In other words, the medicines; if they are clearly indicated, should be given prudently so that such natural resources and reserves would still be desirably in action. The benefits of such prudent medical conduct include: 1) preservation and boosting of natural healing would ensure permanent or durable cure and reflect positively on longevity, 2) giving less medicines with less chances for side-effects and with lower cost, and 3) deliberate ‘undertreatment’, i.e. prudent treatment, would allow easy-to-follow life style and help avoid iatrogenic (of doctor origin) and accidental overdosing.

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