physician21

about medical tacts and talents

Archive for the tag “alternative medicine”

Physician and physical contact

In the medical field ‘physical contact’ usually implies the medically required contact with patients and its aspect of disease communicability. However, this generally perceived view may need some reform to emphasize the two opposite sides, the profits and the risks. Although modern tools of communication could be of great help, they are used only in cases where direct contact of the doctor with patient is instantly not manageable. What kind of blesses a skilful physician can have in his/her attendance! The look; the affection; the touch; the wisdom and the proof. This may refer to the true start of the medical care from mind and not matter, from tact but not tempt, from thoughtfulness and not automaticity. Some people can argue metaphysical working in even lay and plain dealings and for them the medical cases wouldn’t be exceptions. The medical tactfulness can be gained in steps and over time. It comprises emotional, behavioral, ethical and medical progresses. In my opinion, the value of the clever physician lies in the lengthy and subjective path to acquire such collegial attitude and not only the cost and difficulty of the academic courses. Should the physician’s responsible physical contact be rightly and adequately perceived by the patient, this can be a subject of individuals’ variations. For example, rubbing the hairs and cheering up of a child in a medical session may not look well reasoned by the child’s parent(s). Accordingly, the physician may show sympathy and encouragements just as little and sufficient as possible to balance between his/her emotional generosity from one side and the patient’s understanding and conception from the other.

Cherchez la stagnation

cherchez la stagnation
Stagnation is a non-medical word that may form a basis for a myriad of medical problems. The human health is dependent on a balance between seemingly opposite processes like wear and tear, and production and disposal. Stagnation in this medical context may manifest clinically as bodily and/or psychic illness such as abdominal pain and headache or anxiety and fears, respectively. Here are examples of medically relevant stagnations: emotional, creational, moral, social, physical, sexual, and instant.

Emotionally stagnant person is one who can’t express his/her feeling and thoughts. Creation includes free thinking, learning and bringing ideas into light. Morally stagnant persons are those who insist to do good while they miss support or encouragement from other people. Social prosperity is a matter of acceptance, tolerance, equality and fairness. A body that moves either by doing manual work or sports is likely to be physically cheered. Sexual stagnation may occur due to lack of regular and satisfactory relationship. By instant stagnation I mean a physical disease like biliary or urinary obstruction.

A good physician should consider the pivotal role of “stagnation” in health derangement and learn about the means of its detection and repair.

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