clinic

Human health and filling in the gaps

There are seemingly no clear boundaries between health and disease of humans. From one side the judgement of one’s health may be subjective, and from the other side the feeling of being healthy or sick may be intermingled in the different parts of the same day. One of the most impactful insights in medical sciences is to find the appropriate definition of health and disease statuses. The definition of health laid by the World Health Organization states health as “the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.” Apparently and in practical terms no one on Earth would fit to the WHO definition as being a healthy human.
The human health, being the sum of several biological components or entities, should not be regarded apart from its inherent dynamic nature. It can, therefore, be considered and expressed in hand of mathematical probability estimation. The human health may be, accordingly, defined as the state of satisfactory physical, mental and social showing in average life conditions with or without auxiliary means in terms of lifestyle and/or medical treatment. Therefore, in light of this definition while health state judgment may be individually tailored and appreciated, the presence or absence of certain physical or psychological disease state would be regarded as a constitutional health element for every individual. For the delineation of such constitutional health elements, physicians and other health scientists may succeed in writing down all known conditions (or diseases) with their different possible classifications.
Such dynamic nature of human health should give a red alarm to physicians not to make statements on one’s health based only on some data in limited clinical sessions or visits. In many cases, closer observation and more rigorous data collection may be needed before the health state of an individual can be judged.
On handling certain health condition, the natural body resources and compensatory reserves (so-called natural healing power) should not be overseen, but rather boosted and encouraged. In other words, the medicines; if they are clearly indicated, should be given prudently so that such natural resources and reserves would still be desirably in action. The benefits of such prudent medical conduct include: 1) preservation and boosting of natural healing would ensure permanent or durable cure and reflect positively on longevity, 2) giving less medicines with less chances for side-effects and with lower cost, and 3) deliberate ‘undertreatment’, i.e. prudent treatment, would allow easy-to-follow life style and help avoid iatrogenic (of doctor origin) and accidental overdosing.

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medical ethics and bioethics

Physician and physical contact

In the medical field ‘physical contact’ usually implies the medically required contact with patients and its aspect of disease communicability. However, this generally perceived view may need some reform to emphasize the two opposite sides, the profits and the risks. Although modern tools of communication could be of great help, they are used only in cases where direct contact of the doctor with patient is instantly not manageable. What kind of blesses a skilful physician can have in his/her attendance! The look; the affection; the touch; the wisdom and the proof. This may refer to the true start of the medical care from mind and not matter, from tact but not tempt, from thoughtfulness and not automaticity. Some people can argue metaphysical working in even lay and plain dealings and for them the medical cases wouldn’t be exceptions. The medical tactfulness can be gained in steps and over time. It comprises emotional, behavioral, ethical and medical progresses. In my opinion, the value of the clever physician lies in the lengthy and subjective path to acquire such collegial attitude and not only the cost and difficulty of the academic courses. Should the physician’s responsible physical contact be rightly and adequately perceived by the patient, this can be a subject of individuals’ variations. For example, rubbing the hairs and cheering up of a child in a medical session may not look well reasoned by the child’s parent(s). Accordingly, the physician may show sympathy and encouragements just as little and sufficient as possible to balance between his/her emotional generosity from one side and the patient’s understanding and conception from the other.

clinic

Cherchez la stagnation

cherchez la stagnation
Stagnation is a non-medical word that may form a basis for a myriad of medical problems. The human health is dependent on a balance between seemingly opposite processes like wear and tear, and production and disposal. Stagnation in this medical context may manifest clinically as bodily and/or psychic illness such as abdominal pain and headache or anxiety and fears, respectively. Here are examples of medically relevant stagnations: emotional, creational, moral, social, physical, sexual, and instant.

Emotionally stagnant person is one who can’t express his/her feeling and thoughts. Creation includes free thinking, learning and bringing ideas into light. Morally stagnant persons are those who insist to do good while they miss support or encouragement from other people. Social prosperity is a matter of acceptance, tolerance, equality and fairness. A body that moves either by doing manual work or sports is likely to be physically cheered. Sexual stagnation may occur due to lack of regular and satisfactory relationship. By instant stagnation I mean a physical disease like biliary or urinary obstruction.

A good physician should consider the pivotal role of “stagnation” in health derangement and learn about the means of its detection and repair.